How Do I Use Essential Oils In Texas?

If you’re a beginner to essential oils, in Texas there are three primary ways essential oils enter the body: applied to the skin, inhaled, or ingested. When choosing the right method to use essential oils, always keep in mind the desired result you are wanting and then determine the best application for use.

Essential oils can enter the body by being applied to the skin. This method can vary from using a compress, gargling, bath or even massage. It requires several drops of essential oils to be used topically in some manner. It is important to note that most essential oils should not be applied directly to the skin without being diluted.

Inhalation methods vary from steam, spray, dry evaporation, or diffusion. While people inhale and diffuse essential oils for a variety of reasons, it has been shown that inhalation is most effective and best suited to treat a variety of respiratory complaints. Using an atomizing essential oil diffuser is the most highly recommended inhalation method.

Although, ingestion of essential oils has had much controversy in Texas, I suggest you do the proper research yourself and use safe practices. Cases of death, organ failure and hospitalization in the history of aromatherapy have been caused by ingesting essential oils. Therefore, ask the right people the right question. Is it safe?

Texas, Governor Greg Abbott today participated in a conference call for Governors hosted by the White House and led by Secretary of Health and Human Services Sylvia Burwell and Center for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Tom Frieden to discuss strategies to address the Zika threat and efforts to combat the virus.

“Texas is working with our local and federal partners to ensure Texans are protected from the Zika virus,” said Governor Abbott. “With the recent floods, and as we enter the height of mosquito season, I encourage Texans to take precautions to protect themselves from mosquito exposure and heed all warnings and recommendations from health officials.”

Governor Abbott has activated the Texas Task Force on Infectious Disease Preparedness and Response. The Task Force and the Department of State Health Services are currently finalizing the Zika Virus Preparedness and Response Plan.

The Governor is also working with federal and state agencies to determine potential funding available to aid local communities in addressing the Zika threat. The most important thing Texans can do is to remain vigilant, including when traveling abroad to countries experiencing Zika outbreaks and eliminating standing water. Governor Greg Abbott today requested Individual and Public Assistance for 12 Texas counties, including: Austin, Brazoria, Brazos, Fort Bend, Grimes, Hidalgo, Hood, Montgomery, San Jacinto, Travis, Waller, and Washington.

If the request is granted by the President, affected citizens in these counties may be eligible for Individual Assistance grants of up to $33,000 from the federal government, and low-interest disaster loans from the U.S. Small Business Administration.

“This month’s severe weather and flooding devastated the properties and lives of thousands of Texans across the state,” said Governor Abbott. “Today’s disaster declaration in Texas is the first step in helping these Texans rebuild their lives. Texans are resilient by nature, and with the proper resources, we will together overcome the challenges we face.”

Governor Greg Abbott today added Brown, Caldwell, Callahan, Clay, Comanche, Eastland, Falls, Hardin, Harris, Houston, Madison, Somervell, Stephens, Travis, and Trinity Counties to his June 1st disaster declaration following severe weather and flooding in parts of Texas. Additional counties may be added as damage assessments are submitted.

Texas, Texas is the second largest state in the United States by both area and population. Geographically located in the south central part of the country, Texas shares borders with the other US states of Louisiana to the east, Arkansas to the northeast, Oklahoma to the north, New Mexico to the west, and the Mexican states of Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo León, and Tamaulipas to the southwest, while the Gulf of Mexico is to the southeast.

Houston is the most populous city in Texas and the fourth largest in the US, while San Antonio is the second most populous in the state and seventh largest in the US. Dallas–Fort Worth and Greater Houston are the fourth and fifth largest metropolitan statistical areas in the country, respectively. Other major cities include Austin, the second most populous state capital in the US, and El Paso. Texas is nicknamed the Lone Star State to signify its former status as an independent republic, and as a reminder of the state's struggle for independence from Mexico. The "Lone Star" can be found on the Texan state flag and on the Texan state seal. The origin of the state name, Texas, is from the word, "Tejas", which means 'friends' in the Caddo language.

Traveling from east to west, one can observe terrain that ranges from coastal swamps and piney woods, to rolling plains and rugged hills, and finally the desert and mountains of the Big Bend.

The term "six flags over Texas"[note 1] refers to several nations that have ruled over the territory. Spain was the first European country to claim the area of Texas. France held a short-lived colony. Mexico controlled the territory until 1836 when Texas won its independence, becoming an independent Republic. In 1845, Texas joined the United States as the 28th state. The state's annexation set off a chain of events that caused the Mexican–American War in 1846. A slave state before the American Civil War, Texas declared its secession from the US in early 1861, and officially joined the Confederate States of America on March 2 of the same year. After the Civil War and the restoration of its representation in the federal government, Texas entered a long period of economic stagnation.



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