How Do I Use Essential Oils In New Mexico?

If you’re a beginner to essential oils, in New Mexico there are three primary ways essential oils enter the body: applied to the skin, inhaled, or ingested. When choosing the right method to use essential oils, always keep in mind the desired result you are wanting and then determine the best application for use.

Essential oils can enter the body by being applied to the skin. This method can vary from using a compress, gargling, bath or even massage. It requires several drops of essential oils to be used topically in some manner. It is important to note that most essential oils should not be applied directly to the skin without being diluted.

Inhalation methods vary from steam, spray, dry evaporation, or diffusion. While people inhale and diffuse essential oils for a variety of reasons, it has been shown that inhalation is most effective and best suited to treat a variety of respiratory complaints. Using an atomizing essential oil diffuser is the most highly recommended inhalation method.

Although, ingestion of essential oils has had much controversy in New Mexico, I suggest you do the proper research yourself and use safe practices. Cases of death, organ failure and hospitalization in the history of aromatherapy have been caused by ingesting essential oils. Therefore, ask the right people the right question. Is it safe?

New Mexico, New Mexico offers plenty of reasons to celebrate, ranging from a chile fest to an alien bash to a duck race. No place in the universe has a more beloved, and specific, local cuisine than New Mexico. It’s a land whose state question is “red or green (chile)?” Some of the most unique events, however, involve New Mexico's undeniable culture, such as Santa Fe's Indian and Spanish Markets, Native American dances at the pueblos, and the many fiestas held on town plazas throughout the state. Of course, one of our most picturesque events, the Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta, fills the sky with unforgettable beauty each October. Find your next great adventure now. Adventure that feeds the soul begin here.

from high-mountain meadows to endless rolling prairies, New Mexico’s landscapes are out of this world and beyond description. Floating high above this storied landscape of cities, villages and wide-open plains in a hot-air balloon is both a grand adventure and peaceful and meditative experience. With nearly a million visitors each year, Albuquerque’s International Balloon Fiesta™ may be the world’s largest and best-known ballooning event – but it is not alone, as balloons set sail across New Mexico year-round. Balloon festivals in Taos, White Sands, Gallup, Angel Fire and Elephant Butte join with Albuquerque to make hot-air ballooning in New Mexico and year-round adventure.

No place in the universe has a more beloved, and specific, local cuisine than New Mexico. It’s a land whose state question is “red or green (chile)?” New Mexicans take their eating seriously.

Homegrown New Mexico cuisine is a mosaic of all cultures. Combining the corn and chile from its Native American ancestors, along with the spicy preparation styles of the Spanish-speaking people, New Mexico’s cultural ingredients intermingle and complement each other. This New Mexico mosaic has been collecting pieces since Coronado's expedition.

Rural life has been a defining aspect of the history of New Mexico, which today celebrates that history and heritage through farmers’ markets, Indian markets, Spanish markets and fiestas staged in nearly every corner of the state.

New Mexico, The climate of New Mexico is generally semiarid to arid, though areas of continental and alpine climates exist, and its territory is mostly covered by mountains, high plains, and desert. The Great Plains (High Plains) are located in Eastern New Mexico, similar to the Colorado high plains in eastern Colorado.

The two states share similar terrain, with both having plains, mountains, basins, mesas, and desert lands. New Mexico's average precipitation rate is 13.9 inches (350 mm) a year. The average annual temperatures can range from 64 °F (18 °C) in the southeast to below 40 °F (4 °C) in the northern mountains. During the summer, daytime temperatures can often exceed 100 °F (38 °C) at elevations below 5,000 feet (1,500 m), the average high temperature in July ranges from 97 °F (36 °C) at the lower elevations down to 78 °F (26 °C) at the higher elevations. Many cities in New Mexico can have temperature lows in the teens. The highest temperature recorded in New Mexico was 122 °F (50 °C) at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Loving on June 27, 1994, and the lowest recorded temperature is −50 °F (−46 °C) at Gavilan on February 1, 1951.

New Mexico contains extensive habitat for many plants and animals, especially in desert areas and piñon-juniper woodlands. Creosote bush, mesquite, cacti, yucca, and desert grasses, including black grama, purple three-awn, tobosa, and burrograss, cover the broad, semiarid plains of the southern portion of the state. The northern portion of the state is home to many tree species such as ponderosa pine, aspen, cottonwood, spruce, fir, and Russian olive, which is an invasive species. Native birds include the greater roadrunner (Geococcyx californianus, the state bird of New Mexico) and wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

Other fauna present in New Mexico include black bears, cougars, jaguars, coyotes, porcupines, skunks, Mexican gray wolves, deer, elk, Plains bison, collared peccary, bighorn sheep, squirrels, chipmunks, pronghorns, western diamondbacks, kangaroo rats, jackrabbits, and a multitude of other birds, reptiles, and rodents. The black bear native to New Mexico, Ursus americanus amblyceps, was formally adopted as the state's official animal in 1953.



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  1. Albuquerque (NM)

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