How Do I Use Essential Oils In Nevada?

If you’re a beginner to essential oils, in Nevada there are three primary ways essential oils enter the body: applied to the skin, inhaled, or ingested. When choosing the right method to use essential oils, always keep in mind the desired result you are wanting and then determine the best application for use.

Essential oils can enter the body by being applied to the skin. This method can vary from using a compress, gargling, bath or even massage. It requires several drops of essential oils to be used topically in some manner. It is important to note that most essential oils should not be applied directly to the skin without being diluted.

Inhalation methods vary from steam, spray, dry evaporation, or diffusion. While people inhale and diffuse essential oils for a variety of reasons, it has been shown that inhalation is most effective and best suited to treat a variety of respiratory complaints. Using an atomizing essential oil diffuser is the most highly recommended inhalation method.

Although, ingestion of essential oils has had much controversy in Nevada, I suggest you do the proper research yourself and use safe practices. Cases of death, organ failure and hospitalization in the history of aromatherapy have been caused by ingesting essential oils. Therefore, ask the right people the right question. Is it safe?

Nevada, Today, Nevada is the nation's seventh largest state in land area. Several hundred mountain ranges cross its landscape, many with elevations over 10,000 feet. In contrast, the State's lowest point (along the Colorado River) is only 470 feet above sea level. From majestic mountains to desert valleys, nature has endowed Nevada with diverse and unique ecosystems.

In mid-1864, Nevada's Constitutional Convention adopted a description of the features to be placed on Nevada's Great Seal. The Territorial Legislature had approved the description of the seal for the Territory of Nevada on November 29, 1861. The Territorial Seal included the motto "Volens et Potens," which means "Willing and Able," expressing the ideas of loyalty to the Union and the mineral wealth to sustain it.

On February 24, 1866, the Legislature changed the motto on the seal to "All for Our Country." In 1969, Nevada Revised Statutes 235.010 was amended by Assembly Bill 157 to make the legal description conform to the actual features of the seal.

The design of The Great Seal of the State of Nevada is described as follows:
In the foreground, there are two large mountains, at the base of which, on the right, is located a quartz mill, and on the left, a tunnel, penetrating the silver leads of the mountain, with a miner running out a carload of ore, and a team loaded with ore for the mill. Immediately in the foreground, there are emblems indicative of the agricultural resources of the State including a plow, a sheaf, and a sickle. In the middle ground, there is a railroad train passing a mountain gorge and a telegraph line extending along the line of the railroad. In the extreme background, there is a range of snow-clad mountains, with the rising sun in the east. Thirty-six stars (to signify Nevada as the 36th state to join the Union) and the motto, "All for Our Country," encircle the entire illustration. In an outer circle, the words "The Great Seal of the State of Nevada" are engraved, with "Nevada" at the base of the seal and separated from the other words by two groups of three stars each.


Two large metal versions of the seal may be found on both the north and south exterior faces of the Legislative Building, a gift from the Government of Taiwan to the Nevada Legislature. Taiwan was designated as Nevada's sister state in 1985.

Nevada, Much of the northern part of the state is within the Great Basin, a mild desert that experiences hot temperatures in the summer and cold temperatures in the winter. Occasionally, moisture from the Arizona Monsoon will cause summer thunderstorms; Pacific storms may blanket the area with snow. The state's highest recorded temperature was 125 °F (52 °C) in Laughlin (elevation of 605 feet or 184 metres) on June 29, 1994. The coldest recorded temperature was −52 °F (−47 °C) set in San Jacinto in 1972, in the northeastern portion of the state.

The Humboldt River crosses the state from east to west across the northern part of the state, draining into the Humboldt Sink near Lovelock. Several rivers drain from the Sierra Nevada eastward, including the Walker, Truckee, and Carson rivers. All of these rivers are endorheic basins, ending in Walker Lake, Pyramid Lake, and the Carson Sink, respectively. However, not all of Nevada is within the Great Basin. Tributaries of the Snake River drain the far north, while the Colorado River, which also forms much of the boundary with Arizona, drains much of southern Nevada.

The mountain ranges, some of which have peaks above 13,000 feet (4,000 m), harbor lush forests high above desert plains, creating sky islands for endemic species. The valleys are often no lower in elevation than 3,000 feet (910 m), while some in central Nevada are above 6,000 feet (1,800 m).

The southern third of the state, where the Las Vegas area is situated, is within the Mojave Desert. The area receives less rain in the winter but is closer to the Arizona Monsoon in the summer. The terrain is also lower, mostly below 4,000 feet (1,200 m), creating conditions for hot summer days and cool to chilly winter nights (due to temperature inversion).

Nevada and California have by far the longest diagonal line (in respect to the cardinal directions) as a state boundary at just over 400 miles (640 km). This line begins in Lake Tahoe nearly 4 miles (6.4 km) offshore (in the direction of the boundary), and continues to the Colorado River where the Nevada, California, and Arizona boundaries merge 12 miles (19 km) southwest of the Laughlin Bridge.



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