How Do I Use Essential Oils In Maryland?

If you’re a beginner to essential oils, in Maryland there are three primary ways essential oils enter the body: applied to the skin, inhaled, or ingested. When choosing the right method to use essential oils, always keep in mind the desired result you are wanting and then determine the best application for use.

Essential oils can enter the body by being applied to the skin. This method can vary from using a compress, gargling, bath or even massage. It requires several drops of essential oils to be used topically in some manner. It is important to note that most essential oils should not be applied directly to the skin without being diluted.

Inhalation methods vary from steam, spray, dry evaporation, or diffusion. While people inhale and diffuse essential oils for a variety of reasons, it has been shown that inhalation is most effective and best suited to treat a variety of respiratory complaints. Using an atomizing essential oil diffuser is the most highly recommended inhalation method.

Although, ingestion of essential oils has had much controversy in Maryland, I suggest you do the proper research yourself and use safe practices. Cases of death, organ failure and hospitalization in the history of aromatherapy have been caused by ingesting essential oils. Therefore, ask the right people the right question. Is it safe?

Maryland, Women in technology are a driving force behind Maryland’s position as a technology powerhouse. In fact, Maryland ranks second among the states in the ratio of female to male workers in IT occupations (24%), according to ComTIA’s Cyberstates analysis. The national average for women who hold computer and mathematical positions is 26.5%, however in Baltimore, women hold 31.2% of these positions. This, combined with a below average gender pay gap, puts Baltimore fourth in SmartAsset’s “Best Cities for Women in Tech” rankings.

See a trend? We do.

We saw an even greater trend when we started researching to find some of the state’s female tech leaders. There are so many women leading technology companies, conducting critical government work in technology, and breaking new ground in developing new technologies. It’s not just a few names out there. There are countless women in technology who are thriving here in Maryland.

As mission operations manager, Alice Bowman leads the team controlling NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft on its voyage to Pluto and beyond, from “mission control” at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland. She joined the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in 1997, and has served on various spacecraft teams such as the Midcourse Space Experiment, CONTOUR and New Horizons.

A serial entrepreneur, Sharon Brackett has helped found and lead technology companies for the past decade. In 2011 she founded Tiresias Technologies, Inc. to address the unique technical needs of government and commercial interests in the Baltimore/Washington corridor. In January 2015 she was appointed as Engineer In Residence for 3D Maryland. She is a team member of the HoCo STEAM initiative and a steering committee member of Women In Technology of Central Maryland.

Jan Baum leads the charge in building a 21st century 3D Printing/Additive Manufacturing (3DP/AM) industry in the region. She has instituted industry best practices for Maryland, and has established multiple innovation and prototyping labs educating future workforce leaders and helping businesses compete using 3DP/AM technologies. In addition to leading the 3D Innovation Institute as Executive Director, Jan Baum is Principal at J. Baum + Associates LLC and a full professor.

Maryland, Maryland is a state located in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States, bordering Virginia, West Virginia, and Washington, D.C. to its south and west; Pennsylvania to its north; and Delaware to its east. The state's largest city is Baltimore, and its capital is Annapolis. Among its occasional nicknames are Old Line State, the Free State, and the Chesapeake Bay State. The state is named after Queen Henrietta Maria, wife of King Charles I of England and mother of Charles II and James II.

One of the original Thirteen Colonies, Maryland is considered to be the birthplace of religious freedom in America, when it was formed in the early 17th century as an intended refuge for persecuted Catholics from England by George Calvert. George Calvert was the first Lord of Baltimore and the first English proprietor of the then-Maryland colonial grant. Maryland was the seventh state to ratify the United States Constitution, and played a pivotal role in the founding of Washington, D.C., which was established on land donated by the state.

Maryland is one of the smallest states in terms of area, as well as one of the most densely populated, with around 6 million residents. With its close proximity to the nation's capital, and a highly diversified economy spanning manufacturing, services, and biotechnology, Maryland has the highest median household income of any state.

As is typical of states on the East Coast, Maryland's plant life is abundant and healthy. A good dose of annual precipitation helps to support many types of plants, including seagrass and various reeds at the smaller end of the spectrum to the gigantic Wye Oak, a huge example of white oak, the state tree, which can grow in excess of 70 feet (21 m) tall.

Middle Atlantic coastal forests, typical of the southeastern Atlantic coastal plain, grow around Chesapeake Bay and on the Delmarva Peninsula. Moving west, a mixture of Northeastern coastal forests and Southeastern mixed forests cover the central part of the state. The Appalachian Mountains of western Maryland are home to Appalachian-Blue Ridge forests. These give way to Appalachian mixed mesophytic forests near the West Virginia border.



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