How Do I Use Essential Oils In Hawaii?

If you’re a beginner to essential oils, in Hawaii there are three primary ways essential oils enter the body: applied to the skin, inhaled, or ingested. When choosing the right method to use essential oils, always keep in mind the desired result you are wanting and then determine the best application for use.

Essential oils can enter the body by being applied to the skin. This method can vary from using a compress, gargling, bath or even massage. It requires several drops of essential oils to be used topically in some manner. It is important to note that most essential oils should not be applied directly to the skin without being diluted.

Inhalation methods vary from steam, spray, dry evaporation, or diffusion. While people inhale and diffuse essential oils for a variety of reasons, it has been shown that inhalation is most effective and best suited to treat a variety of respiratory complaints. Using an atomizing essential oil diffuser is the most highly recommended inhalation method.

Although, ingestion of essential oils has had much controversy in Hawaii, I suggest you do the proper research yourself and use safe practices. Cases of death, organ failure and hospitalization in the history of aromatherapy have been caused by ingesting essential oils. Therefore, ask the right people the right question. Is it safe?

Hawaii, Hawai‘i’s State Park System is composed of 51 state parks encompassing approximately 30,000 acres on the 5 major islands. These parks offer varied outdoor recreation and heritage opportunities. The park environments range from landscaped grounds with developed facilities to wildland areas with trails and primitive facilities.

The Hawaii outdoor recreation program offers a diversity of coastal and wildland recreational experiences, including picnicking, camping, lodging, ocean swimming, snorkeling, surfing, sunbathing, beach play, fishing, sightseeing, hiking, pleasure walking, and backpacking. The heritage program protects, preserves, and interprets excellent examples of Hawai‘i’s natural and cultural heritage. The exceptional scenic areas are managed for their aesthetic values while vantage points are developed for their superb views of our Hawaiian landscape.

We invite you to experience Hawai‘i’s special environment, learn more about its unique history, and participate in the outdoor recreational opportunities by visiting our parks. But these uniquely Hawaiian resources are fragile and irreplaceable. So as you visit, please help us protect these resources for future generations. The park offers commanding views of the lush, amphitheater-headed Kalalau Valley from 4000 feet elevation. Wildland picnicking, tent camping and lodging. Hiking in native rain forest and along rim of Waimea Canyon; additional trails in neighboring forest reserves. Excellent area for observation of native plants, forest birds and insects. Seasonal plum picking and trout fishing. Pig hunting in public hunting area.

Braving a long and rutted dirt road rewards the traveler with a stunning beach park. Picnicking and tent camping on wild coastline with large sand beach backed by dunes. Scenic setting, colorful sunsets and good views of the high sea cliffs of Nāpali Coast. Swimming in Hawaii in summer during calm conditions; shore fishing. Beware of strong, offshore currents. Hot, dry area. Nāpali Coast is a very special place. The pali, or cliffs, provide a rugged grandeur of deep, narrow valleys ending abruptly at the sea. Waterfalls and swift flowing streams continue to cut these narrow valleys while the sea carves cliffs at their mouths. Extensive stone walled terraces can still be found on the valley bottoms where Hawaiians once lived and cultivated taro.

Hawaii, The state encompasses nearly the entire volcanic Hawaiian archipelago, which comprises hundreds of islands spread over 1,500 miles (2,400 km). At the southeastern end of the archipelago, the eight main islands are—in order from northwest to southeast: NiÊ»ihau, KauaÊ»i, OÊ»ahu, MolokaÊ»i, LānaÊ»i, KahoÊ»olawe, Maui and the Island of HawaiÊ»i. The last is the largest island in the group; it is often called the "Big Island" or "HawaiÊ»i Island" to avoid confusion with the state or archipelago. The archipelago is physiographically and ethnologically part of the Polynesian subregion of Oceania.

Hawaii's diverse natural scenery, warm tropical climate, abundance of public beaches, oceanic surroundings, and active volcanoes make it a popular destination for tourists, surfers, biologists, and volcanologists. Because of its central location in the Pacific and 19th-century labor migration, Hawaii's culture is strongly influenced by North American and Asian cultures, in addition to its indigenous Hawaiian culture. Hawaii has over a million permanent residents, along with many visitors and U.S. military personnel. Its capital is Honolulu on the island of OÊ»ahu. A somewhat divisive political issue arose in 1978 when the Constitution of the State of Hawaii added Hawaiian as a second official state language. The title of the state constitution is The Constitution of the State of Hawaii. Article XV, Section 1 of the Constitution uses The State of Hawaii.

Diacritics were not used because the document, drafted in 1949, predates the use of the okina (ʻ) and the kahakō in modern Hawaiian orthography. The exact spelling of the state's name in the islands' language is Hawaiʻi. In the Hawaii Admission Act that granted Hawaiian statehood, the federal government recognized Hawaii as the official state name. Official government publications, as well as department and office titles, use the traditional Hawaiian spelling with no symbols for glottal stops or vowel length. In contrast, the National and State Parks Services, the University of Hawaiʻi and some private enterprises implement these symbols. A precedent for changes to U.S. state names was set in 1780 when the Massachusetts Bay State changed its name to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the 1820s when the Territory of Arkansaw changed the spelling of its name to the Territory of Arkansas



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  1. Honolulu (HI)

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