How Do I Use Essential Oils In Arkansas?

If you’re a beginner to essential oils, in Arkansas there are three primary ways essential oils enter the body: applied to the skin, inhaled, or ingested. When choosing the right method to use essential oils, always keep in mind the desired result you are wanting and then determine the best application for use.

Essential oils can enter the body by being applied to the skin. This method can vary from using a compress, gargling, bath or even massage. It requires several drops of essential oils to be used topically in some manner. It is important to note that most essential oils should not be applied directly to the skin without being diluted.

Inhalation methods vary from steam, spray, dry evaporation, or diffusion. While people inhale and diffuse essential oils for a variety of reasons, it has been shown that inhalation is most effective and best suited to treat a variety of respiratory complaints. Using an atomizing essential oil diffuser is the most highly recommended inhalation method.

Although, ingestion of essential oils has had much controversy in Arkansas, I suggest you do the proper research yourself and use safe practices. Cases of death, organ failure and hospitalization in the history of aromatherapy have been caused by ingesting essential oils. Therefore, ask the right people the right question. Is it safe?

Arkansas, Celebrate the American Hiking Society’s National Trails Day this Saturday, June 4 with Buffalo National River and the Ozarks Highlands Trail Association.

Buffalo National River will launch a new “Adopt A Trail” program at 10 a.m. in the Tyler Bend Pavilion. Learn how you can adopt a park trail and help the park care for it. Then join the rangers for a guided hike and learn about other Centennial events happening in the park this year. Bring a sack lunch and eat with everyone in the Tyler Bend Pavilion afterwards in Arkansas.

After lunch the OHTA will go to Grinders Ferry and dedicate a wooden foot bridge on the Arkansas Buffalo River Trail. Following the dedication the Little Buffalo River Band will play at 2 p.m. at the Tyler Bend Pavilion. Music will be followed by a barbecue dinner and guitar picking.

The day is meant to introduce hikers, new and experienced, to local trails and public lands, and to connect people with an interest in Arkansas public lands to hiking and trail organizations.

For more information on the Arkansas day’s events and to RSVP for dinner, visit www.nps.gov/buff and click on our Centennial Events page. To learn more about the Ozark Highlands Trail Association visit www.ozarkhighlandstrail.com. For additional information on the American Hiking Society’s National Trails Day® visit www.americanhiking.org.

Arkansas’s climate allows one to hike year round and the state’s diverse topography offers a range of scenic territory to explore. Trails course through a variety of landscapes including mountain terrain, pine and bottomland hardwood forests, and alongside rivers and streams. Arkansas is home to 52 state parks and three national forests and there are a wealth of trails to choose from across the six regions of the state.

Burton said some of his favorite hiking spots include the Buffalo National River area, North Sylamore Creek, and the Little Missouri Falls area. He said he plans to enjoy the trails around the Arkansas Blanchard Springs Recreation Area on July 17. “There are several trails that go out from the campground there depending on the level that the person wants to try,” he said.

Arkansas, Arkansas (Listeni/ˈɑːrkənsɔː/) is a state located in the Southeastern region of the United States. Its name is of Siouan derivation, denoting the Quapaw Indians. The state's diverse geography ranges from the mountainous regions of the Ozark and the Ouachita Mountains, which make up the U.S. Interior Highlands, to the densely forested land in the south known as the Arkansas Timberlands, to the eastern lowlands along the Mississippi River and the Arkansas Delta. Known as "the Natural State", Arkansas has many diverse regions that offer residents and tourists a variety of opportunities for outdoor recreation.

Arkansas is the 29th largest in square miles and the 33rd most populous of the 50 United States. The capital and most populous city is Little Rock, located in the central portion of the state, a hub for transportation, business, culture, and government. The northwestern corner of the state, including the Fayetteville–Springdale–Rogers Metropolitan Area and Fort Smith metropolitan area, is also an important population, education, and economic center. The largest city in the eastern part of the state is Jonesboro. The largest city in the southeastern part of the state is Pine Bluff.

The Territory of Arkansas was admitted to the Union as the 25th state on June 15, 1836. Arkansas withdrew from the United States and joined the Confederate States of America during the Civil War. Upon returning to the Union, the state would continue to suffer due to its earlier reliance on slavery and the plantation economy, causing the state to fall behind economically and socially. White rural interests continued to dominate the state's politics until the Civil Rights movement in the mid-20th century. Arkansas began to diversify its economy following World War II and now relies on its service industry as well as aircraft, poultry, steel and tourism in addition to cotton and rice.

According to the 2006–2008 American Community Survey, 93.8% of Arkansas' population (over the age of five) spoke only English at home. About 4.5% of the state's population spoke Spanish at home. About 0.7% of the state's population spoke any other Indo-European languages. About 0.8% of the state's population spoke an Asian language, and 0.2% spoke other languages.



Pick Your City in AR

  1. Little Rock (AR)

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