How Do I Use Essential Oils In Alaska?

If you’re a beginner to essential oils, in Alaska there are three primary ways essential oils enter the body: applied to the skin, inhaled, or ingested. When choosing the right method to use essential oils, always keep in mind the desired result you are wanting and then determine the best application for use.

Essential oils can enter the body by being applied to the skin. This method can vary from using a compress, gargling, bath or even massage. It requires several drops of essential oils to be used topically in some manner. It is important to note that most essential oils should not be applied directly to the skin without being diluted.

Inhalation methods vary from steam, spray, dry evaporation, or diffusion. While people inhale and diffuse essential oils for a variety of reasons, it has been shown that inhalation is most effective and best suited to treat a variety of respiratory complaints. Using an atomizing essential oil diffuser is the most highly recommended inhalation method.

Although, ingestion of essential oils has had much controversy in Alaska, I suggest you do the proper research yourself and use safe practices. Cases of death, organ failure and hospitalization in the history of aromatherapy have been caused by ingesting essential oils. Therefore, ask the right people the right question. Is it safe?

Alaska, The U. S. Congress created the Alaska Historical Library and Museum on June 6, 1900, directing the Secretary of the District of Alaska to utilize certain fees for the district's historical library fund. It instructed the governor to collect laws, papers and periodicals of the district (and later territory), as well as other related materials of historical interest.


An Act of Congress in 1905 declared that all fees received by the Secretary from all sources be set apart and used specifically for the benefit of the Alaska Historical Library and Museum. Under the Organic Act of 1912, the District of Alaska became a territory of the United States with the majority of revenue fees diverted to the general fund.


A U. S. Attorney General's opinion in 1922 declared the Alaska Historical Library and Museum a territorial (not a federal) institution. Following this decision, the Alaska Territorial Legislature created the Territorial Historical Library and Museum Commission. The Legislature appropriated money for its operation in an act approved in 1923. In 1940, the territory purchased Judge James Wickersham's Alaska collection, which significantly enriched and supplemented the Library's holdings. In 1966, the Alaska Historical Library was separated from the Alaska State Museum and became a part of the new Division of State Libraries. At this time, all photographs, maps, and diaries were permanently transferred to the Library.


When the Alaska State Archives was established in 1970, public state records were transferred to it from the Historical Library, which retained all manuscript and photograph records and papers produced by the private sector. In 1975, the Alaska Legislature placed the Alaska State Library in charge of the distribution of state publications to libraries. Historical Collections receives the first copy of any state publication deposited under this program.


In 1992, in order to clarify that the Historical Library is an integral part of the Alaska State Library, this section was designated the Alaska Historical Collections.

Alaska, Alaska is the northernmost and westernmost state in the United States and has the most easterly longitude in the United States because the Aleutian Islands extend into the eastern hemisphere. Alaska is the only non-contiguous U.S. state on continental North America; about 500 miles (800 km) of British Columbia (Canada) separates Alaska from Washington. It is technically part of the continental U.S., but is sometimes not included in colloquial use; Alaska is not part of the contiguous U.S., often called "the Lower 48". The capital city, Juneau, is situated on the mainland of the North American continent but is not connected by road to the rest of the North American highway system.

The state is bordered by Yukon and British Columbia in Canada, to the east, the Gulf of Alaska and the Pacific Ocean to the south and southwest, the Bering Sea, Bering Strait, and Chukchi Sea to the west and the Arctic Ocean to the north. Alaska's territorial waters touch Russia's territorial waters in the Bering Strait, as the Russian Big Diomede Island and Alaskan Little Diomede Island are only 3 miles (4.8 km) apart. Alaska has a longer coastline than all the other U.S. states combined.

Alaska is the largest state in the United States in land area at 663,268 square miles (1,717,856 km2), over twice the size of Texas, the next largest state. Alaska is larger than all but 18 sovereign countries. Counting territorial waters, Alaska is larger than the combined area of the next three largest states: Texas, California, and Montana. It is also larger than the combined area of the 22 smallest U.S. states.

Also referred to as the Panhandle or Inside Passage, this is the region of Alaska closest to the rest of the United States. As such, this was where most of the initial non-indigenous settlement occurred in the years following the Alaska Purchase. The region is dominated by the Alexander Archipelago as well as the Tongass National Forest, the largest national forest in the United States. It contains the state capital Juneau, the former capital Sitka, and Ketchikan, at one time Alaska's largest city. The Alaska Marine Highway provides a vital surface transportation link throughout the area, as only three communities (Haines, Hyder and Skagway) enjoy direct connections to the contiguous North American road system.



Pick Your City in AK

  1. Anchorage (AK)

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